Cover #1 By Bendis, Mack: CIA Comic Creator Spy Spectacular!

Cover #1 By Bendis, Mack: CIA Comic Creator Spy Spectacular!

Cover #1, from powerhouse creators Bendis and Mack, is ingenuity and incredulity at its best!

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Blast off into a whole new territory of comic book creation complete with comic artist humor, scintillating spies /slash/ love interests, and a much more creative CIA recruitment process than this writer previously suspected possible.

Cover #1 is fresh and page-turningly addictive

The art, from character building that is good enough to feel their very bones, to the sharp dialogue, to the insanely surreal artwork that echoes feeling, suspense and often transcends panels, is fresh and page-turningly addictive.

Cover #1 from Jinxworld by writer Brian Bendis, artist David Mack and colorist Zu Orzu truly captures the imagination of James Bond fans, artists, and comic con fans alike.

Both covers are so rad!

Both covers of issue #1, by David Mack and the variant by Zu Orzu, have readers floored.

Each encompasses the main characters Max and Julia in stark silhouettes filled with words.

These point to secrecy in the CIA and a nearly subliminal and powerful new dynamic between the recruiter and artist.

The colors in the book itself (and on the covers) by Zu Orzu bring amazing tones where pieces of color and story significance jump out at the reader.

And the father-son samurai flashbacks are absolutely gorgeous.

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The father-son dynamic for Max is something that must be of extra importance to the character and must be further explored in the series.

The premise is fairly simple at the onset: a talented comic book creator, Max, who travels a lot to showcase his craft meets a fan of his, Julia, who purchases some of his original artwork and coyly states that she follows him online.

It is likely not a chance encounter.

We will not spoil anything.

But comic book creators can make for the perfect cover as operatives in an ever-volatile world where intelligence and counter-intelligence operatives tread dangerously.

Artist David Mack has worked with the US Embassy to volunteer his art and mentoring to help youths across the globe after all.

He certainly has insight and perspective and has been collaborating with writer Brian Michael Bendis to birth Cover for years now.

Cover #1 is the launch of another creator-owned gem from Jinxworld

Cover #1 is the launch of another creator-owned gem from Jinxworld and with an award-winning team like Bendis and Mack at the top of their games, not to mention artist Zu Orzu’s accentuating colors, readers are hungry for Cover #2!

Grab a copy at your LCS now – Red Shirt Comics got me!

“Cover #1 By Bendis, Mack: CIA Comic Creator Spy Spectacular!” was written by R.J. Huneke.

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Jessica Jones Creators Bendis + Gaydos’ Pearl Intrigues

Jessica Jones Creators Bendis + Gaydos’ Pearl Intrigues

Jessica Jones creators Bendis + Gaydos’ Pearl intrigues readers, as the duo’s newest heroine brings grit and a steady hand to the tattoo parlor and the Yakuza gang wars surrounding San Francisco.

Pearl #1 introduces us to the young woman, her Iriguci spider tattoo, and her very capable gunshot.Jessica Jones, Michael Gaydos, Pearl, Pearl #1, Brian Michael Bendis, Alias

The vivid and poignant illustrations form a neo-noir San Francisco befitting of Pearl, and the motorcycle scenes storm across the pages blisteringly.

Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos once created a new character in Jessica Jones (in the pages of ALIAS), the brash female P.I. with super strength and super alcohol tolerance.

And their newest unwilling participant in a ruptured feud is another fictional personage one cannot get enough of.

Pearl is wary, sexy, and her instincts are sharp!

Jessica Jones, Michael Gaydos, Pearl, Pearl #1, Brian Michael Bendis, Alias

The dialogue, timely placed motorcycle VRROOMMM’s (and other cutting sound effects) and a storyline of mysterious relationships, both new and old, that envelop Pearl’s life make for writing that utterly absorbs the reader.

SPOILER WARNING!!!!!

Pearl #1 introduces us to a world of effervescent color and feeling.

Pearl is a young tattoo artist tied to the city’s age-old feud by some act from her past.

Jessica Jones, Michael Gaydos, Pearl, Pearl #1, Brian Michael Bendis, Alias

Her night out with a girlfriend leads to a young man, named Rick, who notices a rare and revered tattoo artist’s work on her wrist.

He promises he is not hitting on her, but he too is a tattoo artist and a connoisseur drinking in her Iriguci spider, comparing it to the Mona Lisa.

And so, egged on by her friend, Pearl engages with Rick and his friends up until the second that he shows off his own work, a piece of a Yakuza tattoo on his buddy’s back.

Pearl tries to walk away.

But the bikes are already gunning through the air, the bullets flying.

She takes a shot to the arm, but fires her own semi-automatic handgun and the aim is true, killing gang members and saving Rick’s life.

The act holds consequences.

She is further tied to another gangster, Mr. Miike, a tattoo artist bearing his own Yakuza portraits.

Her steady hand is to be used to do more than needle ink.

Pearl is more useful, valuable, to him now.

Can she murder the man she just saved outright?

Can Pearl kill Rick when she finds him in her place and he is flirting, offering what seems to be thank you sex for her saving his life?

The tattoo artist Pearl has a history, a conflicted present, and a dangerous future.

The Pearl creator-owned series is off to a brilliant start!

Grab a copy at your LCS now – Red Shirt Comics got me!

“Jessica Jones Creators Bendis + Gaydos’ Pearl Intrigues” was written by R.J. Huneke.

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Death Of Superman In Ominous Man Of Steel 5

Death Of Superman In Ominous Man Of Steel 5

Death of Superman in ominous Man Of Steel 5 cover, alone, had me.

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The Brian Michael Bendis Superman mini-series, his first book in his D.C. Comics run, is enveloping, surprising and terribly suspenseful in its first 5 of 6 issues. But that Ivan Reis, Joe Prado, and Alex Sinclair The Man Of Steel 5 cover wrenched at my heart, just as Dan Jurgens’ cover of Superman 75 “The Death Of Superman” did as a kid so many years ago.

Lois cradling Superman in his torn duds, fallen among his seemingly dead enemy, Doomsday, with a tattered red cape flapping in the wind like an American flag gone through a battlefield is iconic.

And this homage in The Man of Steel 5 alludes to rubble and a looming death for Superman and possibly for many others too.

SPOILER ALERT (for Death Of Superman homage in The Man Of Steel issues 1-5)****

Rogul Zaar has been said to have destroyed Krypton, after all, and he is not happy that the son of Jor El escaped his ‘cleansing’ of the universe from the ‘plague’ of the Kryptonian ways.

And so as he, this new menacing and mysterious zealot – though his past as a defender of the universes adds a lot more to his character than mere obsession – mops the proverbial floor with Superman and Supergirl in Metropolis, we learn to fear him.

But at the start of Bendis’ fifth part of the tale, a giant eye peers down at the last Kryptonian city, Kandor.

It is evil.

It is murderous.

And it brings death.

This is right before Rogul Zaar destroys the city of Kandor and its entire people.

Superman and Supergirl are devastated that their promise to un-shrink the last living city of their home planet is dead.

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The brilliant artwork in this issue, done by Adam Hughes, Jason Fabok, and Alex Sinclair, is poignant in its depiction of the fury of the battles, the concerned faces realizing the stakes, the ominous flashback, and the ferocity of the situation.

But with Superman’s true home, earth as his major concern, and thus a disadvantage to his human concern f, he takes the heavyweight title fight to space.

And while the Justice League gathers in Metropolis, Zaar goes toe-to-toe with Supes and eventually succeeds in burying him, unconscious, within the surface of the moon.

Wow, this villain is powerful!

The flashbacks of Clark Kent, Lois, and their son Jon speaking to Jor El, who comes from who knows where, to take the descendant of El on a tour of the galaxies is key.

It seems Lois may have either gone with their son, or just outright walked out on Clark who may have changed his mind and let their child go off-planet.

The human element of Clark and Superman, written by Bendis, is again remarkable.

[See “Review: The Man of Steel #1 Brings New Humanity To Superman”].

We have a family gone to a dysfunctional state, and Jon would be a target of Rogul Zaar should he catch wind of his existence.

Maybe Jor El really takes his grandson away to spare him the sight of his father dying for the sake of earth . . . again?

So far Lois is gone, Superman is flirting with the new fire department captain, and Clark is riddled with concern over his son’s potential trip off planet.

Does he foresee his own demise, defending earth to the last?

Certainly Zaar is too great a foe for even the Justice League and the Green Lantern Corps standing guard.

And Superman, the father, knows this, realizes shortly after being revived by the Justice League that he alone can stop Zaar’s plan and flies away alone.

Clark knows that Zaar will see earth as a new planet to be sacrificed to the cause.

Zaar must wipe out the world he sees as now infested with the touch of Krypton from one man to all of them spreading, like bed bugs.

And at the heart of the moon is the ancient creature’s own doomsday device built within a fiery heart of unknowns.

Will Superman die?

Will earth die?

Can Zaar be stopped?

I have rarely been so excited to read a series and so anxious to revel in its finale!

“Death Of Superman In Ominous Man Of Steel 5” was written by R.J. Huneke

Be sure to pick up this book at your local comic shop, and if you are in Port Jefferson go right to my LCS Red Shirt Comics – they have them in stock . . . for now!

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Review: The Man of Steel #1 Brings New Humanity To Superman

Review: The Man of Steel #1 Brings New Humanity To Superman

In this review The Man of Steel #1 brings new humanity to Superman and also to Krypton, with the planet’s dangerous demand for resources to expand its trade system of commerce coming to light from the unlikeliest of sources.

Brian Michael Bendis adds a riveting storyline backed by a sharp edge to the Superman mythos that is very relevant today.

The artwork for The Man of Steel #1 in the 6-issue weekly mini-series is stunning!

the man of steel #1, Rogul Zaar, Brian Michael Bendis, superman, krypton

The bad-ass creative team for The Man of Steel #1 is as follows:

THE MAN OF STEEL #1

Written by Brian Michael Bendis

Art by Ivan Reis, Joe Prado, Jason Fabok, Alex Sinclair, Cory Petit

Edited by Jessica Chen, Michael Cotton, Brian Cunningham

Published by DC Comics

Release Date: May 30, 2018

The intricate, tight, and incredible style of all of the artwork feels like a DC Universe we recognize with a fresh take on the (80 year old) Superman character.

All of the artwork is extraordinary, but the bright effervescent colors by Alex Sinclair balancing some deep shadows and blacks give life, realism, and sheer superhero-ness, for lack of a better term, in a way rarely done before.

SPOILER WARNING***

From the pages of Action Comics #1000, we caught the Present Day in the Brian Michael Bendis Era where a new relentless villain, Rogul Zaar, emerges onto the DCU to give Supes a beating and a slicing in Metropolis.

And worse, Zaar claims to have destroyed Superman’s home world, killing his parents.

The opening of The Man of Steel #1 reads simply: “Krypton: Many Years Ago.”

And there in the past in front of an un-named council of overseers of the universe is Rogol Zaar!

And he is considered by the council as a hero and one they give great respect.

They hear him out as he states that the “plague” of Krypton is a greedy colonial push for commerce that will instill interplanetary war and consume many worlds as they pursue their increasing lust for decreasing resources.

This makes Krypton seem far more human than ever before!

The planet of the red sun is home to mortal beings that have faults and flaws, and their own imperialism and need for more and more resources to further their technological prowess, despite the deaths and downsides that can emerge from this, is truly a flawed and more realistic look at Kal El’s lineage than we have previously seen.

There have always been flaws with his brethren who ignored Jor El’s warnings of planetary destruction, but only in the movie Man of Steel do we see a more human look at the people who, in their greed, bring about their planet’s own demise.

Bendis takes this apt portrayal into a deep and much more realistic depiction of humanity on Krypton, even though in the first issue we have yet to see a single Kryptonian except for Superman himself.

This is so stark a view of our own world, let alone the emerging technical prowess of Krypton that we know of from the Superman canon that readers are left taken aback.

Things are not black and white in the United States, or the world at large, and neither are they in the Brian Michael Bendis Era.

“Writing Superman in today’s day and age is a such powerful experience,” Bendis told Forbes when The Man of Steel was announced. “We live in a world where we’ve heard, ‘Truth, justice, and the American way’ our whole lives, right? But this is the first time those things are really not to be taken for granted. Truth has been revealed to not be as black and white as we thought it was; justice is sadly not always for everybody; and the American Dream, the American way of everybody coming here to pursue the idea that they can live a safe and healthy life — these are ideas we always took for granted, but now we don’t. No matter where you are politically, we just don’t take these things for granted anymore.

“And now I think it’s time Superman stand up and give us that hope we always want from him. It’s a great thing to be writing a character who exudes hope at a time when people really, really need it.”

Zaar wishes to prevent bloodshed in an outright war and asks the council to instead wipe out Krypton.

He is later respectfully informed, at the end of The Man of Steel #1, that they do not see aggression from Krypton and will let them be.

The bulk of Zaar immediately questions if the council was paid off.

Brian Michael Bendis Brings New Humanity To Superman

What is equally intriguing about this opening saga is that Superman is shown to be far more human, in his costume as Superman, than he is as Clark Kent.

It is true The Man of Steel #1 is a small sample size.

But seeing Superman stop amidst all of his chivalrous deeds, flying like a god, to simply listen to a local musician’s take on a catchy song is simply brilliant.

Bendis, in a single page, makes the Man of Steel so much more human than the bumbling Clark Kent.

The writer who created one of the most human and realistic superheroes of all time in Jessica Jones, the private investigator and flawed female protagonist in Marvel’s comic series Alias, is adept at letting life, politics, and all of the warts and grace of humanity in civilization bring his stories and world building to amazing heights.

Superman now has more ancillary characters of importance, like the female fire chief Superman meets in a burning building, just as the great Jerry Ordway and Dan Jurgens often did in their writing of the character before.

Building on the firefighter, Bendis has given us a rare moral dilemma that is truly endearing with her and Superman.

We all have the thought at some point even if we would never act on it, and Superman now does too: despite his wife Lois (who is currently MIA at the Daily Planet) and their child, he shows lingering interest in the firefighter.

This is not an outright infidelity interest, but if for no other reason then fleshing out the mortal humanity in a superhero above all superheroes, Superman is shown to at least have the thought and sexual urges that all people share.

What is more human than that?

 

Pick up The Man of Steel #1 now, and follow with The Man of Steel #2 on Wednesday at your Local Comic Shop; my LCS in Port Jefferson is Red Shirt Comics and I will be there!

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“Review: The Man of Steel #1 Brings New Humanity To Superman” is written by R.J. Huneke

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“I wish you could hear this…” Brian Michael Bendis, Ivan Reis/DC Comics